Tuesday, March 12, 2019

30th Anniversary of the World Wide Web










Today is the 30th Anniversary of the World Wide Web.  In 1989 the Internet was born, or hatched and our lives on this planet were forever changed.  I am not sure this is for the better.  I mean look at how many treat the Internet as though it were a life or death if they don't log in everyday. Plus many have started using the net for illegal purposes.  There are also the bullies, the pranksters that are getting out of hand.  But the Internet has done a lot of good too. 
It has opened the door for family members to stay in touch around the world. It has saved lives by helping people communicate the needs in areas devastated by natural disasters.  It has helped too link healthcare providers so they can come up with better treatments for patients.  Plus it has opened the doors up to better communication on topics of war, activism, and keeping the peace.
Last week, Democratic lawmakers announced a new proposal to restore net neutrality laws in an effort to undo the Federal Communications Commission's repeal of rules that ensured equal and open access to all websites and services for internet users and content providers.

Even though I agree with Tim Berners-Lee that crime is more organized because of the World Wide Web.   It's not all bad, and yes we can do better.  But lets not turn the Internet into a monitored police tool. We need an open web.


Last week, Democratic lawmakers announced a new proposal to restore net neutrality laws in an effort to undo the Federal Communications Commission's repeal of rules that ensured equal and open access to all websites and services for internet users and content providers. Their are powerful companies that now control vast swaths of user attention, and the prospect that the open and fair internet that facilitated the growth of those companies is at risk.


 I believe the inventor said it best.  "The inventor of the world wide web has called for global efforts to tackle state-sponsored hacking, criminal behavior and abusive language on the internet, in an open letter marking the 30th anniversary of the revolutionary technology.

Tim Berners-Lee acknowledged that "many people feel afraid and unsure if the web is really a force for good," in a letter published for his World Wide Web Foundation on Monday.

"While the web has created opportunity, given marginalized groups a voice, and made our daily lives easier, it has also created opportunity for scammers, given a voice to those who spread hatred, and made all kinds of crime easier to commit," the letter added."




But I believe we need to fix data privacy, the role of misinformation in our society, but at the same time not squash free speech,  and the role of social media in a democracy that doesn't hurt cultures.


1 comment:

Richard C said...

Congratulations on your blog and a happy anniversary to the "series of tubes."